ABIBLOG: ABICOR BINZEL's Welding Blog

Florian Görlitz

Recent Posts

EWR 2: Reduce shielding gas consumption and save money now

Posted by Florian Görlitz on Dec 23, 2020 4:59:29 AM

Why shielding gas offers a huge savings potential

The valve is opened and there it is: the shielding gas for welding. Depending on the requirements of the welding task, the gas pressure and gas quantity are still set with the manometer before starting. Pre-flow time? Rather a little longer. Better safe, than sorry. The same applies to the post-flow time. Whether this lasts a few seconds longer or not does not seem to make much difference. Or maybe it does? The fact is: the shielding gas consumption is usually much too high. With the gas management system EWR 2 you can save money in gas shielded arc welding.

Topics: Shielding Gas

Practical tips for welding: 3 reasons for not using water as a coolant for welding

Posted by Florian Görlitz on Nov 3, 2020 2:32:04 AM

What do you actually use to cool your welding torch? Is water from the regular piping system running through the cooling system of your power source or have you filled in coolant? And do you often have to cope with torch failures? If this is the case, the choice of your coolant could provide information about the reason for the frequent torch failures. In fact, water is often used as a coolant during welding. Why this is not a good idea at all, and why it can even cause torch failures, is explained in this blog.

Practical tips for welding: How to remove and prevent weld spatter

Posted by Florian Görlitz on Sep 14, 2020 11:41:21 AM

Anti-spatter spray, anti-spatter liquids, anti-spatter fluid and more

You have to break an egg to make an omelet. Especially with MIG/MAG welding, weld spatter occurs, which can already be heard from afar. With this »crackling and cracking« small metal droplets are created that are hurled from the weld pool or from the hot liquid electrode end to the workpiece surface or land on the weld seam and the torch wear parts. Excessive weld spatter is caused, for example, by an incorrectly set welding current, a non-optimal arc, incorrect polarity or insufficient gas shielding. However weld spatter occurs ... burnt weld spatter has to be removed again. This rework costs time and money. Anyone who welds wants to keep the adhesion of weld spatter as low as possible. And if they do stick, they can easily be removed again. Here we answer the questions that our field staff are asked the most on site.